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Rivka Galchen: “The Lost Order”

Click here to read the story in its entirety on The New Yorker webpage. Rivka Galchen’s “The Lost Order” was originally published in the January 7, 2013 issue of The New Yorker. Betsy: In “The Last Order,” Rivka Galchen has created a little 50 minute hour of someone telling a story that many a therapist has probably heard:…

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William Maxwell: “The Lily-White Boys”

William Maxwell, one of my favorite authors, has a classic Christmas story called “The Lily-White Boys,” which is appropriately happy and melancholy. I was pleased to see The Library of America post a PDF of it in their excellent “Story of the Week” series, and I simply want to link to…

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Christmas Blog Giveaway: The Neighborhood

I happen to have an extra, brand-new copy of one of my favorite books of the year: Gonçalo M. Tavares’s The Neighborhood (my review here; my books of the year post here). What a fantastic book. I’d like to give it to one of you. Here’s how we’re going to do this: 1….

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My Favorite Reads of 2012

The following eleven books are the best I read in 2012. Once again, the selection is overrun by books published by NYRB Classics; they published five of the books below. When I went through my reading year to make this list, I certainly didn’t favor any particular publisher over another; they really…

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Thomas Pierce: “Shirley Temple Three”

Click here to read the story in its entirety on The New Yorker webpage. Thomas Pierce’s “Shirley Temple Three” was originally published in the December 24 & 31, 2012 issue of The New Yorker. Before reading “Shirley Temple Three” I had never heard of Thomas Pierce, and I wondered if…

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Wieslaw Mysliwski: Stone Upon Stone

The best book I read this year was Wieslaw Mysliwski’s Stone Upon Stone (Kamien na kamieniu, 1999; tr. from the Polish by Bill Johnston, 2010). I actually finished this book back in March, before it won The Best Translated Book Award, but that was a very busy time for me and then…

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Tatiana Salem Levy: “Blazing Sun”

Tatiana Salem Levy’s “Blazing Sun” (“O Rio sua”; tr. from the Portuguese by Alison Entrekin) is the third story in Granta 121: The Best of Young Brazilian Novelists. For an overview of the issue and links to my reviews of its other stories, please click here. This beautiful little piece…

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Natsume Soseki: The Gate

Trevor reviews Natsume Soseki’s quiet yet tumultuous 1910 novel, The Gate. Read the full post.

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Marisa Silver: “Creatures”

Click here to read the abstract of the story on The New Yorker webpage (this week’s story is available only for subscribers).  Marisa Silver’s “Creatures” was originally published in the December 17, 2012 issue of The New Yorker. Perhaps I will write more about this one in the comments because right now…

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Alice Munro: “Dolly”

“Dolly” is the tenth story in Alice Munro’s new short story collection, Dear Life. For an overview of the book and links to my reviews of its other stories, please click here. This story first appeared in this year’s Tin House Summer Reading issue. I put off reading it until now simply…

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Welcome Betsy

A few years ago, Betsy began commenting on the weekly posts about the fiction in The New Yorker, delighting us with her detailed, insightful analyses. She doesn’t know this, but about a year ago I was going to ask her if she would like to move her comments into the…

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Louise Erdrich: The Round House

A recent convert to Louise Erdrich, I was excited when The Round House (2012) won the National Book Award last month, the first major award Erdrich has taken home since she won the National Book Critics Circle Award for her debut novel, Love Medicine, in 1984. Thrilled she won, yes, because she’s an exceptional American author. Honestly,…

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Steven Millhauser: “A Voice in the Night”

Click here to read the story in its entirety on The New Yorker webpage. Steven Millhauser’s “A Voice in the Night” was originally published in the December 10, 2012 issue of The New Yorker. Steven Millhauser’s latest, though still concerned with the passage of time and, to an extent, art, is not at…