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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

EV 25

David and I are back with another episode of The Eclipse Viewer, the podcast dedicated to the Criterion Collection’s Eclipse Series of DVDs.

In this episode we discuss the first four films made by Akira Kurosawa, one of the most important directors of all time. As in the Kinoshita set we reviewed last month, these films were made during and just after World War II. These are packaged in Eclipse Series 23: The First Films of Akira Kurosawa: Sanshiro Sugata (1943); The Most Beautiful (1944); Sanshiro Sugata, Part Two (1945); and The Men Who Tread on the Tiger’s Tail (1945).

Please find the podcast, the shownotes, and plenty of links over at CriterionCast here.

Kurosawa Eclipse

In the next episode of The Eclipse Viewer, David and I will be continuing our excursion in to films made during World War II, shifting from the east to the west, by discussing Eclipse Series 34: Jean Grémillon During the Occupation. This set features the following three films: Remorques (1941), Lumière d’Été (1943), and Le Ciel Est à Vous (1944).

By | 2015-02-25T12:42:59+00:00 February 25th, 2015|Categories: Eclipse Viewer, Podcast|Tags: |2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Lee Monks February 25, 2015 at 3:54 pm

    Marvellous. Can you see the Kurosawa to come here?

  2. Trevor Berrett February 25, 2015 at 6:31 pm

    Yes and no, Lee. What I mean by that is that you can see some of his themes and some of his technique just starting to sent up shoots. But these in no way, to me, suggest the birth of a great filmmaker like Kurosawa. I much prefer Kinoshita’s first films.

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