2666 Part 4

2666 Read-Along — Part 4: The Part about the Crimes

Every life, Epifanio said that night to Lalo Cura, no matter how happy it is, ends in pain and suffering. That depends, said Lalo Cura. Depends on what, champ? On lots of things, said Lalo Cura. Say you’re shot in the back of the head, for example, and you don’t…

2666 Part 3

2666 Read-Along — Part 3: The Part about Fate

After some deep and illuminating conversations about the first two parts thanks to all our fellow readers, it’s time to continue the 2666 read-along with this post on Part 3: The Part about Fate. Please come on in and let us know your thoughts! Read the full post.

2666 Part 2

2666 Read-Along — Part 2: The Part about Amalfitano

Lee and Trevor (and many of you!) continue the 2666 read-along with this post on Part 2: The Part about Amalfitano. Please come on in and let us know your thoughts! Read the full post.

I The Part About the Critics

2666 Read-Along — Part 1: The Part about the Critics

Lee and Trevor kick-off the 2666 read-along with this post on Part 1: The Part about the Critics. Please come on in and let us know your thoughts! Read the full post.

* I am grateful to Corey Goldberg, who took the original photograph of the weathered cherub (see it on his Tumblr here) and gave me permission to use in this artwork. ~Trevor

Roberto Bolaño: By Night in Chile (reread)

Lee and Trevor reread Roberto Bolano’s By Night in Chile in preparation for the read-along of 2666. Read the full post.

A Little Lumpen Novelita

Roberto Bolaño: A Little Lumpen Novelita

Trevor reviews Roberto Bolaño’s A Little Lumpen Novelita, which is apparently the last, the final, Bolaño novel we will be getting. Read the full post.

2666-2

Read-along: Roberto Bolaño’s 2666

Trevor and Lee are hosting a readalong of Roberto Bolaño’s 2666, a book they’ve both read and have not been able to shake. Not that this will help. Read the full post and learn about the readalong.

Roberto-Bolano's-Fiction

Chris Andrews: Roberto Bolaño’s Fiction: An Expanding Universe

Chris Andrews, who has translated ten of Roberto Bolaño’s books into English, has just graced us with an in-depth critical analysis of Bolaño’s fiction, Roberto Bolaño’s Fiction: An Expanding Universe, just out from Columbia University Press. Trevor, a fan of both Bolaño and Andrews, offers his presumably biased thoughts. Read the full post.

slide

Roberto Bolaño: “Mexican Manifesto”

Click here to read the story in its entirety on The New Yorker webpage. Roberto Bolaño’s “Mexican Manifesto” (tr. from the Spanish by Laura Healy) was originally published in the April 22, 2013 issue of The New Yorker. Trevor Reading “new” fiction by Roberto Bolaño is problematic. From what I know (which isn’t much), now that we’ve…

slide

Roberto Bolaño: The Secret of Evil

I know that there is some criticism toward publishing anything we can find written by Roberto Bolaño.  The most recent, The Secret of Evil (El secreto del mal, 2007; tr. from the Spanish by Chris Andrews, with Natasha Wimmer, 2012) is actually composed of some stories and sketches (many obviously incomplete) found on…

slide

Roberto Bolaño: “Labyrinth”

Click here to read the story in its entirety on The New Yorker webpage.  Roberto Bolaño’s “Labyrinth” was originally published in the January 23, 2012 issue of The New Yorker. I’m a big fan of Roberto Bolaño, though it didn’t come easy.  My first encounter with the now legendary writer was in…

slide

Roberto Bolaño: Between Parentheses

I’m a little late in bringing up the latest Roberto Bolaño book, Between Parentheses: Essays, Articles, and Speeches, 1998 – 2003 (Entre parentesis, 2004; tr. by Natasha Wimmer, 2011).  It came out earlier this year, and beyond the first week after its release I haven’t really heard much about it.  I’m behind in getting…

slide

Roberto Bolaño: Antwerp

Most of Bolaño’s New Directions book covers are similar in style.  I’ve liked them.  However, because Antwerp (Amberes, 2002; tr. from the Spanish by Natasha Wimmer, 2010) looked so different, I’ve been more excited to read it.  It arrived in a coverless hardback, small-sized and well designed, simple and bold.  It suggests…